As part of the whole food revolution, more and more families have taken to raising chickens and other poultry birds in their homes. With this trend, there comes a concern that people are not accounting for bacterial issues relating to live farm animals. This has led to the creation of an environment that is easily susceptible to outbreaks, such as the one at hand relating to various forms of Salmonella.

On July 19, 2016, the CDC provided its first update in over a month regarding a series of Salmonella outbreaks linked to live poultry. These birds are mostly found in backyard flocks. One more outbreak and 287 more cases of illness have been associated with these birds. There are now 8 outbreaks under investigation. These outbreaks are all caused by different strains of Salmonella bacteria, but they all share the same source. As of July 14, 2016, 611 people have been sickened in the outbreaks, and these illnesses have been detected in almost every state in the United States. There have been 138 reported hospitalizations because of the outbreak, and 1 death has been reported.

The first outbreak under investigation was caused by Salmonella Enteritidis bacteria. There have now been 205 cases of illness associated with this outbreak, from 23 states. Seventy-three cases have been added since the last update. The first outbreak has caused 41 hospitalizations. One death has been reported, although Salmonella is not considered to be the cause of death. The outbreak has affected 23 states, including California with 6 cases, Colorado with 1 case, Connecticut with 9 cases, Florida with 9 cases, Kentucky with 17 cases, Maine with 1 case, Maryland with 2 cases, Michigan with 32 cases, Minnesota with 2 cases, Missouri with 6 cases, North Carolina with 4 cases, New Hampshire with 1 case, New York with 35 cases, Ohio with 30 cases, Oklahoma with 1 case, Pennsylvania with 13 cases, Rhode Island with 3 cases, South Carolina with 1 case, Virginia with 5 cases, Vermont with 15 cases, Washington with 3 cases, Wisconsin with 2 cases, and West Virginia with 7 cases.

The second outbreak, caused by Salmonella Muenster, has sickened a total of 24 people. Since the initial announcement on June 2, 2016, 5 more cases of illness have been reported. Eight out of the 24 sickened needed to be hospitalized because of their illnesses. Cases of Salmonella poisoning connected to this outbreak began between March 11 and May 29, 2016. This outbreak affected 8 states, including Indiana with 2 cases, Kentucky with 1 case, Michigan with 5 cases, Missouri with 1 case, New York with 1 case, Ohio with 7 cases, Pennsylvania with 2 cases, and Tennessee with 5 cases.

The next outbreak was caused by Salmonella Hadar. The update to this outbreak added 24 more cases of illness, bringing the total to 66. Twenty people were hospitalized because of this outbreak. Those sickened by Salmonella Hadar ranged in age from 1 year to 77 years old. More than 80% of those interviewed reported contact with live poultry prior to their illness. This outbreak caused illnesses in 22 states, including Alabama with 3 cases, Alaska with 1 case, Arkansas with 3 cases, Colorado with 3 cases, Georgia with 1 case, Iowa with 1 case, Massachusetts with 1 case, Minnesota with 3 cases, Mississippi with 1 case, Montana with 6 cases, New Jersey with 1 case, New York with 3 cases, North Carolina with 10 cases, North Dakota with 2 cases, Oregon with 1 case, Pennsylvania with 4 cases, South Carolina with 6 cases, South Dakota with 3 cases, Tennessee with 1 case, Texas with 1 case, Virginia with 7 cases, and West Virginia with 4 cases.

The fourth outbreak associated with live poultry has sickened a total of 86 people, and was caused by Salmonella Indiana bacteria. The outbreak update has added 40 more cases of illness since the initial announcement. The illnesses associated with this outbreak began between March 26, 2016, and June 11, 2016. About 28% of those sickened in this outbreak needed to be hospitalized. More than 80% of ill people reported contact with live poultry prior to their illness. This outbreak has affected 20 states so far, including Alabama with 10 cases, Alaska with 1 case, Arkansas with 3 cases, California with 3 cases, Colorado with 1 case, Georgia with 6 cases, Idaho with 2 cases, Minnesota with 1 case, Mississippi with 4 cases, Montana with 7 cases, North Carolina with 15 cases, North Dakota with 1 case, New Hampshire with 1 case, Ohio with 1 case, Oregon with 1 case, South Carolina with 3 cases, South Dakota with 3 cases, Virginia with 9 cases, Washington with 1 case, and West Virginia with 13 cases.

            Outbreak 5, caused by Salmonella Mbandaka, has added 21 more cases of illness in 13 states. This brings the outbreak total to 33 people sickened across 17 states. Those sickened in the outbreak ranged in age from 1 year to 92 years old, but the median age of those sickened is 5 years old. Nine people have had to be hospitalized because of their illness. Over 80% of those interviewed in the investigation reported contact with live poultry before becoming sick. There were 17 states affected by the outbreak, including Alabama with 7 cases, Arizona with 1 case, Arkansas with 1 case, Colorado with 2 cases, Illinois with 1 case, Indiana with 1 case, Iowa with 1 case, Kansas with 1 case, Kentucky with 2 cases, Michigan with 3 cases, North Carolina with 2 cases, Ohio with 5 cases, Oklahoma with 1 case, Tennessee with 1 case, Texas with 1 case, Vermont with 1 case, and Virginia with 2 cases.

            The sixth outbreak associated with live poultry is linked to Salmonella Infantis bacteria. This outbreak has sickened a total of 108 people, up from 35 sick in the initial outbreak announcement. The Salmonella Infantis outbreak has affected people between the ages of 1 and 93, with the median age being 24. Twenty-six people have been hospitalized because of this outbreak, and there have been no deaths reported. There are 30 states affected by this outbreak, including Arizona with 1 case, California with 1 case, Connecticut with 1 case, Georgia with 5 cases, Illinois with 8 cases, Indiana with 5 cases, Iowa with 3 cases, Kentucky with 5 cases, Maryland with 2 cases, Massachusetts with 3 cases, Minnesota with 11 cases, Mississippi with 3 cases, Missouri with 4 cases, Montana with 1 case, Nebraska with 1 case, Nevada with 1 case, New Hampshire with 2 cases, New Jersey with 1 case, New York with 7 cases, North Carolina with 5 cases, North Dakota with 1 case, Ohio with 3 cases, Pennsylvania with 6 cases, South Carolina with 2 cases, South Dakota with 3 cases, Tennessee with 1 case, Texas with 1 case, Virginia with 9 cases, West Virginia with 2 cases, and Wisconsin with 10 cases.

            The last original outbreak was caused by Salmonella Braenderup. This outbreak has sickened a total of 78 people in 19 states. In the initial announcement on June 2, the outbreak had only sickened 38 people. Thirty seven of those sickened by the outbreak have reported recent contact with live poultry. There have been 12 reports of hospitalization, but no reports of death. This outbreak has affected 19 different states, including Arkansas with 1 case, Georgia with 1 case, Illinois with 1 case, Indiana with 4 cases, Kentucky with 9 cases, Massachusetts with 6 cases, Maryland with 1 case, Maine with 1 case, Michigan with 4 cases, Missouri with 6 cases, New Hampshire with 2 cases, New Jersey with 1 case, New York with 20 cases, Ohio with 10 cases, Pennsylvania with 1 case, Texas with 1 case, Utah with 1 case, Washington with 1 case, and Wisconsin with 7 cases.

            In the July 19 update, the CDC also announced that there has been yet another Salmonella outbreak linked to live poultry. This outbreak was caused by Salmonella Infantis, making it the second outbreak in this series caused by S. Infantis bacteria. People sickened in this outbreak reported that their illnesses began between April 6 and May 30, 2016. The outbreak has caused people between the ages of 5 and 59 to become ill, but the median age for this outbreak is 48. Only 3 hospitalizations have been reported, and there have been no reports of death linked to this outbreak. There are 6 states affected by this outbreak, including California with 1 case, Iowa with 1 case, Kansas with 3 cases, Kentucky with 1 case, Nebraska with 4 cases, and New York with 1 case.

            Salmonella poisoning is one of the most common forms of foodborne illness in America. The CDC estimates that there are 1.2 million cases of illness each year caused by Salmonella bacteria. A case of Salmonella poisoning will produce symptoms between 12 and 72 hours after infection. Typically, a Salmonella infection will produce symptoms including nausea, fever, abdominal cramping, and vomiting. Those with certain risk factors, including the elderly, children, and those with suppressed immune systems, may be at an increased risk of developing a serious Salmonella infection. If you or a loved one begins to show the symptoms of a Salmonella infection, contact a medical professional.